RSM's Faces of the World

50

years

behind

the lens

award winning

photographer

Richard Morse

presents

Faces of the World

&

Other Things

2017

view all

Galleries

photographer

Richard Morse presents

Faces of the World

and Other Things

Home

Exhibitions

Contact

Biography

Philosophy

Richard Morse is the third generation of photographers in his family.  It all started in 1909 when his grandfather opened a commercial photo studio in Boston.   Richard graduated from RIT (Rochester Institute of Technology) in 1967 with a B.A. Degree in Photography.  Honing his skills in his family’s Boston studio, he moved to Los Angeles where he founded a television production company, Communications Programming International.

 

It was not long before his wanderlust took over and he began an adventure that continues today.  For more than forty years, he has traveled the world pointing his camera into people’s faces.  “I find a special joy on photographing people whom I meet.  I seem to have a gift in communicating with different people in that way. . . I find a special warmth in their unconditional friendship.

 

The idea for Faces of the World first came to me in 1978, when living in Kantu Aping an Iban Dayak village in Kalimantan Barat, Borneo.  The Iban Dayak’s are the ancient Head Hunters of Borneo.

 

One evening, Bapak (an elder) and I were sitting on the bank of the stream that ran through their village.  It was a night with a clear sky and a bright full moon.  Amongst the Iban Dayaks, the full moon has great symbolism.

 

We both were looking at the moon, the way the light reflected off the water and lit up the dark forest in the background.  Bapak turned, looking at me he pondered, “This is our moon, do you have one like it in your village?”

 

Thinking for a moment, I answered, “Yes, but mine is on the other side of the world.”

 

His head nodding, as he thought . . . looking up with approving eyes Bapak said, “Bagus Bagus (very good).

 

We sat silently for a while looking at the stream.  Turning toward each other, Bapak looked into my eyes as though he was searching for something.

 

“What do you see”, I asked.

 

'You can tell everything about a person by looking directly into their eyes and through their eyes into their sole: Bapak answered.

 

I have done this with my photography.  I approach people, whom I feel will be interesting and ask them to pose for me.  Pointing a camera directly into ones face startles most people, but after a few moments, they relax.  I then position them into the best light -- seeing deeply into their eyes.

Faces of the World

Faces of the World, looks deeply into the eyes of the common person . . .

capturing their emotions . . . their community . . . their daily struggles.

 

Faces of the World, gives this unseen population a platform on which to introduce themselves to the rest of the world.

Saying, "I am just like you.”

 

We must take time to look deeply into each other's eyes

to discover the light that glows within.

 

This simple act will help us gain a better understanding of our neighbors, regardless how distant their home is from ours.

 

This approach to photography has become a vital part of my life and art.

When viewing the galleries, imagine yourself standing in front of each person

looking deeply into their eyes.

See if you can read their thoughts . . .

understand their emotions ... joys . . . sorrows.

 

 

 

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This website and its contents are the copyright property of RSM Faces- Richard Morse © RSM Faces 2016.All rights reserved. Any redistribution or reproduction in part or whole of the contents in any form is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner. 

Galleries

Info

Contact

50

years

behind

the lens

award winning

photographer

Richard Morse

presents

Faces of the World

&

Other Things

2016

view all

Galleries

photographer

Richard Morse

presents

Faces of the World

and Other Things

Home

Exhibitions

Contact

People Gallery

Places & Things Gallery

Biography

Philosophy

Richard Morse is the third generation of photographers in his family.  It all started in 1909 when his grandfather opened a commercial photo studio in Boston.   Richard graduated from RIT (Rochester Institute of Technology) in 1967 with a B.A. Degree in Photography.  Honing his skills in his family’s Boston studio, he moved to Los Angeles where he founded a television production company, Communications Programming International.

 

It was not long before his wanderlust took over and he began an adventure that continues today.  For more than forty years, he has traveled the world pointing his camera into people’s faces.  “I find a special joy on photographing people whom I meet.  I seem to have a gift in communicating with different people in that way. . . I find a special warmth in their unconditional friendship.

 

The idea for Faces of the World first came to me in 1978, when living in Kantu Aping an Iban Dayak village in Kalimantan Barat, Borneo.  The Iban Dayak’s are the ancient Head Hunters of Borneo.

 

One evening, Bapak (an elder) and I were sitting on the bank of the stream that ran through their village.  It was a night with a clear sky and a bright full moon.  Amongst the Iban Dayaks, the full moon has great symbolism.

 

We both were looking at the moon, the way the light reflected off the water and lit up the dark forest in the background.  Bapak turned, looking at me he pondered, “This is our moon, do you have one like it in your village?”

 

Thinking for a moment, I answered, “Yes, but mine is on the other side of the world.”

 

His head nodding, as he thought . . . looking up with approving eyes Bapak said, “Bagus Bagus (very good).

 

We sat silently for a while looking at the stream.  Turning toward each other, Bapak looked into my eyes as though he was searching for something.

 

“What do you see”, I asked.

 

'You can tell everything about a person by looking directly into their eyes and through their eyes into their sole: Bapak answered.

 

I have done this with my photography.  I approach people, whom I feel will be interesting and ask them to pose for me.  Pointing a camera directly into ones face startles most people, but after a few moments, they relax.  I then position them into the best light -- seeing deeply into their eyes.

Faces of the World

Faces of the World, looks deeply into the eyes of the common person . . .

capturing their emotions . . . their community . . . their daily struggles.

 

Faces of the World, gives this unseen population a platform on which to introduce themselves to the rest of the world.

Saying, "I am just like you.”

 

We must take time to look deeply into each other's eyes

to discover the light that glows within.

 

This simple act will help us gain a better understanding of our neighbors, regardless how distant their home is from ours.

 

This approach to photography has become a vital part of my life and art.

When viewing the galleries, imagine yourself standing in front of each person

looking deeply into their eyes.

See if you can read their thoughts . . .

understand their emotions ... joys . . . sorrows.